Pain with Intercourse: Also called dyspareunia. Pain can also be with any penetration. A physical therapist can assess the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “downtraining” the muscles to help relax.

Vulvodynia: Pain around the Vulva. A physical therapist can help assess the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any tenderness. They can assist with understanding the science of pain and muscle “downtraining” and relaxation techniques to decrease the sensitivity of the vulva.

Painful Bladder Syndrome: Also called interstitial cystitis. This is chronic pelvic pressure, pain or discomfort that is perceived to be related to the bladder. Physical therapy can help calm down the bladder and the muscles of the pelvic floor to decrease pain.

PCOS: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a hormonal disorder causing enlarged ovaries with small cysts on the outer edges. Many women experience pain associated with this syndrome and physical therapy can treat this pain by assessing the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “downtraining” the muscles to help relax.

Endometriosis:  Can be a painful a condition in which tissue similar to the endometrium is found outside the uterus on other parts of the body.  A physical therapist can treat the pain associated with this condition by assessing the muscles of the pelvic floor to look for any trigger points or tight bands of muscle that can be released. They can also help with “downtraining” the muscles to help the muscles relax.

Rectal Pain: Pain in the rectum with or without the emptying of stools. Physical therapy can help with proper toileting position and also with pain and trigger points in the rectum and anal area.

Pudendal Neuralgia: Pelvic nerve pain. The pudendal nerve innervates the muscles of the pelvic floor. This nerve can become irritated which can lead to nerve pain in the pelvic muscles. A physical therapist can assess this nerve and help you with strategies to decrease the nerve irritation in the pelvic floor.